Multimedia  

 

Volume 25 Issue 9 - Publication Date: 1 September 2006
Special Issue on CLAWAR 2004
 
Kinematic Model of a New Staircase Climbing Wheelchair and its Experimental Validation
 
R. Morales, V. Feliu, A. González, and P. Pintado School of Industrial Engineering, University of Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain
 
This paper describes the mechanical devices, the movements and the associated kinematic models of a novel wheelchair prototype capable of climbing staircases. The key feature of the mechanical design is the use of two decoupled mechanisms in each axle, one used to negotiate steps, and the other to position the axle with respect to the chair to accommodate the overall slope. This decoupling makes possible many different climbing strategies, the overall mechanism being extraordinarily versatile from a control point of view. Kinematic models have been developed for the different mechanical configurations that appear during all the ascend/descend processes. These models are required to control the actuators of the wheelchair in such a way that its centre of mass is able to follow arbitrary spatial trajectories. This is very important as one has to design very smooth spatial trajectories, keeping a near null inclination of the seat all the time in order to guarantee the comfort of the passenger, usually a handicapped or injured person. A real prototype is presented, and experimental results are reported that show the efficiency of the mechanism and the accuracy of the kinematic models developed.
 
Multimedia Key
= Video = Data = Code = Image
 
Extension
Type
Description
1
Example 1: Simulation of climbing process (rear view). The video shows a simulation of all the task that the wheelchair must perform to climb the stair. (13.8 MB)
2
Example 2: Simulation of climbing process (side view). The video shows a simulation of all the task that the wheelchair must perform to climb the stair. (13.8 MB)
3
Example 3: Video showing the wheelchair movement of the system to arbitrarily position both axles with respect to the frame to accommodate the overall slope. (5.1 MB)
4
Example 4: Video showing the part of the wheelchair corresponding to the device that makes the axle climb one step at a time while allowing the wheel to move around the step without interfering with it (rear rack). (8.3 MB)
5
Example 5: Video showing the part of the wheelchair corresponding to the device that makes the axle climb one step at a time while allowing the wheel to move around the step without interfering with it (front rack). (8.0 MB)
6
Example 6: Experimental stair climbing process. The video shows a climbing stair experiment with the real prototype. (35.5 MB)
 
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